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Tag: Big Data

Will IoT improve your eating habits?

Will IoT improve your eating habits?

29720_french_fries_inline_640_8“This extra-virgin olive oil is a fake!”

I recently came across an interesting article by Amy Webb on how Internet of X will change our lives as we know them now. Essentially, Webb’s theory is that soon, we’ll be able to analyze any product we consume or use – ranging from the chicken in our meal to the multi-vitamin we take – thereby giving us enough information to make informed choices.

The technology for doing most of it exists today – the sensors, spectrometers and gateways, in addition to big data and advanced analytics tools needed. However, someone has to securely store the massive amount of data that can potentially generated, and host advanced search technologies to query the data – question is, who will be paying for that?

Some of it can be paid for by product companies – an example Webb provides is researching the seasoning on your french fries at the restaurant to buy the seasoning to use at home. The seasoning manufacturer would be happy to provide the information in order to grow their sales – but that may not cover the expenses for hosting, access and security.

This brings to mind what we (I work for Harman Connected Services) are doing with a large agricultural company, as well as a different foray into precision farming with a large telecom company.

foodIn the first instance, from a crop grower technology perspective, we are working with measuring the NPK (Nitrogen, Phospate, Potassium) levels – which is one of the biggest focus area of nutrition management of crops.

Nutrition Management broadly addresses 3 areas:

  1. For the grower the cost of nutrition – Optimizing the spend on fertilizer, ensuring that just the needed amount of nutrition is purchased and applied.
  2. For the grower ensuring the the crop gets the required amount of nutrition. The need varies based on growth stage of the crop as well as external factors such as temperature, humidity, soil quality etc.
  3. From the regulatory authority perspective ensuring that seepage of nitrate from fields into neighboring lands (could be an organic field etc.) or water bodies is minimal.

The technologies used are available today – IoT sensors, big data, analytics – but stretching that to Webb’s example is easy. If the data of the food source data (similar to what is collected by us above) was made available by the grower, you could potentially see where your spinach was grown, and how much fertilizer was used to grow it. You could also see if there were any sustainable agriculture practices followed…the list goes on…

All this is very exciting, and businesses will eventually find a way to monetize the data so that it can be made available to the general public securely…just don’t carry a fake Gucci bag to your next cocktail party!

Google, others take on human trafficking using big data tools

Google, others take on human trafficking using big data tools

 

Google, others take on human trafficking using big data tools.

Data analysis, image recognition and mapping programs are helping anti-trafficking nonprofits not only locate victims in real time, but predict their victimizers’ next moves. Going into 2014, the companies and their partners are exploring how to share information to develop global prevention strategies based on traffickers’ behaviors.

Palantir’s software, which sifts volumes of unrelated data for meaningful connections, is key to many of those efforts, including speedy response to victims who call hotlines. It instantly pulls information from disparate sources such as license plate numbers, online ads and cellphone records to locate trafficking victims and connect them with help.

Survey: 95% of Healthcare CEOs Are Exploring Big Data Strategies and Solutions

Survey: 95% of Healthcare CEOs Are Exploring Big Data Strategies and Solutions

 

Survey: 95% of Healthcare CEOs Are Exploring Big Data Strategies and Solutions.

Other key findings include:

  • 89 percent of healthcare CEOs are planning to improve their ability to innovate.
  • 94% plan to alter their customer growth and retention strategies, while 84% plan to alter their channels to market. Few have embarked on these changes, though, let alone completed them.
  • More than four-fifths of healthcare CEOs identified technological advances such as the digital economy, social media, mobile devices and big data as key trends in healthcare transformation.
  • Only 25% have already started or completed the changes they’re planning to make their companies more innovative.
  • Only 33% have altered their technology investments
What Is Hadoop Exactly? A Cynic’s Theory

What Is Hadoop Exactly? A Cynic’s Theory

 

What Is Hadoop Exactly? A Cynic’s Theory.

The thing about Hadoop, per se, is that it’s not a packaged solution by any means. Rather, it’s a complex collection of modules that enable high-quality programmers to leverage massive parallel processing algorithms to do very specific things. But there’s no fancy user interface, and the manuals are brutal.

Add to that challenge this critical hurdle: you also need business people who have at least a general understanding of what it can do. Those folks must be able to conjure up ideas of how it can be used, then communicate to the developers, who must subsequently produce, test, implement and support applications.

Open Source Vendors Blaze a Trail in Advanced Analytics – Enterprise Apps Today

Open Source Vendors Blaze a Trail in Advanced Analytics – Enterprise Apps Today

 

Open Source Vendors Blaze a Trail in Advanced Analytics – Enterprise Apps Today.

Until now, Gartner’s review has tended to focus on the traditional query and reporting capabilities of the various BI vendors. But as data visualization, predictive and prescriptive analysis have risen in popularity and sophistication, there has been a tendency for organizations to deploy multiple tools, for example a full-fledged business intelligence platform from an established vendor supplemented by analytics tools from a startup.

Gartner defines advanced analytics as: “the analysis of all kinds of data using sophisticated quantitative methods (for example, statistics, descriptive and predictive data mining, simulation and optimization) to produce insights that traditional approaches to business intelligence (BI) — such as query and reporting — are unlikely to discover.”

The Magic Quadrant for Advanced Analytics Platforms seems to show companies frequently look to companies other than the traditional BI vendors for advanced analytics capabilities.

European-Hospital: In the era of Big Data radiology is left behind

European-Hospital: In the era of Big Data radiology is left behind

 

European-Hospital: In the era of Big Data radiology is left behind.

During a single-shot thoracic scan that takes a few seconds, the CT captures images that can be converted to quantifiable data for lung nodules, breast masses and calcifications, cardiac chamber size, aortic size, coronary artery calcifications, rib fractures, liver texture, lung texture, bone mineral density, loss of height of vertebral bodies, renal function and renal volume.

In an ideal world, the raw data set from this scan would be stored with meta tags and automated mark-up language, making it discoverable for current health policy information or future research.This data could also be shared locally among other support systems in a hospital for treating patients. Instead, once the radiology report is issued, the data is irretrievably lost, ironically the very moment it is sent to cloud storage.

‘We radiologists need to reinvent ourselves,’ Dr Siegel emphasised. ‘If radiology is going to be important, then just as with lab and genomic data, we need to make our data discoverable, indexed and tagged.’